5 Non-Technical Books Every Developer Should Read

April 29th, 2013 Leave a comment
5 Non-Technical Books Every Developer Should Read

Let’s face it: we all know the books that we should be reading when it comes to technical ideas: heck, our site is full of lists of books that will help you learn everything from Hadoop to Android. Sometimes, however, you need to branch out and learn things that aren’t strictly in the machine realm: that said, here are some books to broaden your horizon and help you get better in areas not strictly code-related! 1. Team Geek By Brian Fitzpatrick, Ben Collins-Sussman Ideally, programming and development is a meritocracy: the programmer who writes the best code is ideal. In reality, however,… View full post »

Why You Should Get Red Hat Linux Certification

April 26th, 2013 Leave a comment
Why You Should Get Red Hat Linux Certification

The obvious reason is to quickly give yourself verifiable credentials with Red Hat Linux for your employer or potential employers to consider when evaluating you for a new position. For most, this is reason enough to go through the certification process. Like other certification programs for development, systems administration, and other IT fields, certification in Red Hat is used as proof of your working knowledge of the platform. Unlike many other certifications, however, receiving a recognized cert in Red Hat also says that you have passed hands-on requirements. Two thirds of the testing requirement for Red… View full post »

The Open-source Development Culture and Why Linux Doesn’t Work Like the Others

April 23rd, 2013 Leave a comment
The Open-source Development Culture and Why Linux Doesn't Work Like the Others

To developers moving from a relatively closed system, such as Windows or OSX environment, to the open Linux architecture, the learning curve involves far more than adding a new language or architecture to your repertoire. It usually means fundamentally changing how things are done from an engineering perspective. Coding in a restricted or closed environment, where access to the source code for related apps and the core platform itself is limited, often means making guesses as to how things will interact and spending a lot of time (and lines of code) working around those interactions or restrictions. … View full post »

How to Use HTML5 Video and Audio Tags

April 19th, 2013 Leave a comment
How to Use HTML5 Video and Audio Tags

HTML5 is going to be a huge revolution if the W3C ever gets around to finalizing the specifications. That being said, and as you probably know, there are some aspects of HTML5 that you can use now. Two of these functions that are currently available to web developers are the audio and video tags. A Bit about HTML5 Audio and Video Before we get into the actual how-to, it is important to understand a bit about how these tags work now and how they might work in the future. The problem is that HTML5 isn’t a standard yet, or at least… View full post »

Ultimate Guide to Link Building Book Review

April 15th, 2013 Leave a comment
Ultimate Guide to Link Building Book Review

This post is a digression from our customary technology topics, but I just finished reading a very exciting new book, Ultimate Guide to Link Building by Eric Ward and Garrett French, and I thought my readers would benefit from my review of this highly anticipated paperback. If you own a website of any kind, regardless of its age, size and purpose, it’s almost a given that it would require some amount of Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Link Building. The latter remains as the single most definitive external factor underscoring a website’s search popularity. I’ve been a subscriber to Eric’s LinkMoses Private… View full post »

Keeping the Big Picture in Development

April 15th, 2013 Leave a comment
Keeping the Big Picture in Development

Many developers in the open source, Linux and Android sectors are familiar with the term “Largeness of Mind”. It’s a term sometimes used in open source circles to remind developers to keep the big picture in mind while working on their apps and plug-ins. In development, it’s easy to become tunnel visioned and focus too heavily on the task at hand (or the problem being troubleshooted) and lose sight of the overall build. In open source projects, this is especially problematic as keeping the big picture in view can mean saving yourself from wasted time or sloppy… View full post »

6 Open Source Big Data Technologies to Keep Tabs On

April 12th, 2013 Leave a comment
6 Open Source Big Data Technologies to Keep Tabs On

It’s safe to say that ‘big data’ is the big buzzword de jour, and that is unlikely to change. Many of the major players in the tech industry are leveraging big data to spectacular and varied effect, and though it may be used a little too much as a buzzword, it is one of the most important developments in the tech industry. What’s more, the cotemporaneous rise of open source software means that many of the most exciting big data technologies are open source, with strong communities developing around many big data tools. In this article, we’ll run through a… View full post »

Working with Offshore Teams: Keys to Success

April 8th, 2013 Leave a comment
Working with Offshore Teams: Keys to Success

It’s difficult to start a piece like this without producing the same old clichés about how we now live in a globalized world, where collaborative work can take place across huge distances, etc. Yet there it is – the reality is that for some industries in particular, it has never been easier to outsource work to offshore teams that are technically proficient and competitive in cost. It’s tempting to offload the work to people who are just as educated and proficient but do it for half the cost. However, with new working practices come new problems, and it’s important to… View full post »

Why Android Training Is Still Key To A Big Bucks Job

April 5th, 2013 Leave a comment
Why Android Training Is Still Key To A Big Bucks Job

“What is the most profitable training route for a programmer to take?” It’s a question that’s often asked of teachers and recruiters everywhere. New programmers (and often experienced ones looking to learn something new) are sometimes paralyzed by choice, and they’re looking for someone with experience in the field they’re branching into that can tell them what skill set will make them attractive to potential employers- or nudge existing employers to give them a raise or promotion. Naturally, you’ll often hear all sorts of suggestions put forward- everything from embedded programming to legacy compatibility and web development will be offered up… View full post »

Top 10 Most Common Android Interview Questions

April 1st, 2013 Leave a comment
Top 10 Most Common Android Interview Questions

Looking for a job as an Android developer? You’ll likely be grilled in the interview to make sure you know what you’re talking about. Here’s a list of some of the most common Android interview questions and how you should handle them! 1. What is Android? You’d be amazed at how many interviewees say “An open-source mobile operating system…” and then start fumbling for words. Be precise and on-point with your explanation without going into too much extraneous detail: Android is a Linux-based mobile operating system that allows developers to create applications that can perform basic and advanced functions for a user. 2…. View full post »

CSS Sprites: A Few Basic Examples

March 27th, 2013 Leave a comment 1 comment
CSS Sprites: A Few Basic Examples

If you have a basic grasp of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and web design, then CSS sprites are an excellent addition to your skill-set. What are CSS sprites? CSS sprites are more of a technique than they are an object. The ‘sprite’ itself is a regular .gif, .jpeg, or .png image consisting of a number of images that you wish to display on a webpage – usually logos or small icons. Using the CSS sprite technique, you can determine which portion of the image will display in any given location on a page. Why ‘sprites’? Sprites as a concept come from the early… View full post »

Technical Interview Going South: A Few Gotchas to Avoid

March 24th, 2013 Leave a comment
Technical Interview Going South: A Few Gotchas to Avoid

The technical interview is probably the most widely feared and poorly understood aspect of the job-and hunting process. A lot of candidates have misconceptions about what is expected of them, and how best to approach a process which can seem difficult to prepare for. Very often, candidates sour their chances not because they haven’t prepared enough, but because they’ve prepared in an unhelpful way, or misunderstood the purpose of the technical interview Here we’ve put together some insights on the nature of the technical interview, and what mistake you should avoid making. It’s An Interview, Jim, But Not As We Know… View full post »

Is LAMP Pack Still Strong?

March 20th, 2013 Leave a comment 2 comments
Is LAMP Pack Still Strong?

This year in tech (like almost every other year) has been filled with buzzwords. Many of them this year, however, are based around big data processing and web content: NoSQL, Hadoop, BigTable – the list goes on. With all the fuss around these new technologies, one might be tempted into thinking that these are the technologies of the future, and that from now on our servers and websites will be built upon, leaving technologies like LAMP in the dust. Is the venerable LAMP stack going to go extinct in the face of all these new technologies? First off, there are things… View full post »

Best Tips to Look for a Job While Still Employed

March 17th, 2013 Leave a comment
Best Tips to Look for a Job While Still Employed

There’s no doubt that trying to find a new job while you’re still in your old one can be difficult. On the one hand, you don’t want to give up your current job without know that there’s another one waiting for you. On the other hand, searching for a job is something that requires a significant investment of time, something likely to be in short supply given that you already have a position to look after. On top of all that, you have fraught office politics to deal with – no-one wants their boss to know that they’re leaving. In… View full post »

Apache Solr vs. elasticsearch: Decision Points

March 14th, 2013 Leave a comment
Apache Solr vs. elasticsearch: Decision Points

Due to the increasing complexity of many dynamic sites and installations as well as user demand for more robust searching systems, many system administrators and developers are looking to implement more complex search abilities into their websites and systems. Two software solutions have risen to the top of the pack in this regard: Apache Solr and elasticsearch. Both are good systems in their own right, but which is better for you and your use scenario? Let’s look at a rundown of their individual capabilities and find out. Right off the bat, Apache Solr is quite a bit easier to deploy than… View full post »