Boris Tulman

Boris is our resident Networking guru. He works as a Network Architect designing and implementing network technologies in ISP, e-commerce and social networking site environments. Boris holds M.S. in Software Engineering, B.S. in Computer Science and a handful of industry certifications. He teaches Networking courses at LearnComputer.

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Top 5 Small Business Switches

January 7th, 2013 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Top 5 Small Business Switches

Small businesses can sometimes have a tough time buying networking equipment. The problem isn’t always a matter of knowing which networking equipment is the best- heavyweights like Cisco, Juniper, and HP have long been providing enterprise-quality switches, routers, and firewalls that are time-tested and well-known for being fast, reliable, and stable. The problem is often the cost- that equipment can cost upwards of thousands of dollars, a budget that often isn’t at all feasible for small businesses. Thankfully, however, there are high-performing, stable, and reliable switches for the small business market that come in at under $1000 and are still… View full post »

Virtualization Technologies Compared

March 15th, 2012 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Virtualization Technologies Compared

I doesn’t matter if you are new to VPS hosting, virtualization technology or if you have been working with these technologies for awhile, choosing the best virtualization solution for your hosted environment can be tricky. In this article we will discuss two of the most prevalent technologies available for VPS hosting: Xen and OpenVZ. While both of these are open-source server virtualization packages, often found in VPS hosting and enterprise-level environments, there are some big differences between the two. The purpose here will be to help you find the best fit for your hosting environment and the… View full post »

NetApp Certification Options

September 30th, 2011 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
NetApp Certification Options

In the world of certifications, there are generally a few that are common knowledge among the general IT networking world: Cisco’s CCNA and CCSP certifications, for example, are known to the majority of the IT world, as are certifications like Microsoft’s MCP program or the A+ certification for desktop support specialists. There are, however, other certifications out there that are definitely worth looking at; certifications that, while not as well-known as some of the above, are great certifications that will help you specialize in a field or niche that you’re interested in: One of these, for example, is NetApp; they specialize… View full post »

Cisco vs. Juniper For Your Network

August 26th, 2011 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Cisco vs. Juniper For Your Network

To a network administrator planning out his first enterprise-level network, hardware is crucial: you need hardware that can run for years without downtime, almost never fail, and have an OS and features that will let you perform the most complex and convoluted networking hoops that unforeseen problems and/or management will inevitably make you run through. For many years, and for many experts, there has always been only one provider that can accomplish all of the above without fail: Cisco Systems. Though Cisco has been entrenched as the networking king for many years, another name has appeared in the running for… View full post »

Brand Name Switches: Worth the Cost?

January 25th, 2011 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Brand Name Switches: Worth the Cost?

The vast majority of network administrators have their preferred networking vendor. Whether it’s Cisco, Juniper, or HP, you’ll often hear the same old chestnuts come down from the server room. Very often, the search for a good switch is drowned out by two sides – those who insist you have to pay dearly for quality, and those who insist a switch is a switch, and the 48-port gigabit offering from anywhere is going to suit you just fine. In today’s IT world, the answer matters quite a bit. There is a very understandable need, especially in the recent years, of saving… View full post »

Outsourcing Email to the Cloud

January 18th, 2011 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Outsourcing Email to the Cloud

In recent months, the “cloud” buzzword has been thrown around quite often. Cloud applications, cloud storage, cloud email, cloud Sharepoint… the list seems endless, and at times it sounds as if the marketing drones in the IT world simply add “cloud” to whatever tag they can think of and try to pitch it to unsuspecting higher-ups who get dazzled by the hype and buy into the cloud. The cloud, however, isn’t always hype. The fact of the matter is that there are occasions where it is both advantageous and cost-effective to host your services in the cloud, and in this article… View full post »

Best Free Android Apps for Network Professionals

October 28th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment 1 comment
Best Free Android Apps for Network Professionals

Network professionals often find themselves on call. All too often, something simple pops up during these on-call periods that could be quickly resolved with the right tools. As a result, many network professionals find themselves lugging around a laptop “just in case”. However, Android phones are now capable of running a number of network applications that can greatly simplify those quick fixes. While they won’t replace the PC versions and they won’t always solve your problem, these 7 applications are indispensable to a network professional and may even save you from dragging out your laptop. Ping This handy… View full post »

IPsec Site-to-Site VPN Best Practices

September 22nd, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
IPsec Site-to-Site VPN Best Practices

It has been a common case for enterprises to implement a site-to-site VPN solution to connect its central office to remote offices. In some cases when leased line is the primary path between the two locations, site-to-site VPN can serve as a backup solution if primary path is to fail. Obviously, if you have to select the right site-to-site VPN solution today, there are lots of options out there with companies like Cisco and Juniper dominating that market. In order to build the right and affordable solution – you should thoroughly analyze your requirements. Will you require a built-in redundancy and… View full post »

Out-of-Band Management of Data Center Infrastructure

August 29th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Out-of-Band Management of Data Center Infrastructure

We recently had a client who asked us to implement the simple and cost effective solution for Out-of-band management for their production data centers. The goal of Out-of-band management is to have a network access to the critical data center infrastructure when company’s network is melted, preventing you to access any devices for troubleshooting purposes. In other words this is meant to be company’s alternative way of accessing data center critical devices. The simplest solution, that we actually ended up implementing, was a static DSL line from a local ISP provider, terminated on Cisco 2611 router, using PPPoE protocol. Cisco 2611… View full post »

Cloud Computing – The Holy Grail of Business

June 11th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Cloud Computing - The Holy Grail of Business

Cloud computing has in many ways become a household name. We hear about applications living in the “cloud” on a regular basis. Cloud computing does offer a lot of benefit to businesses looking to offload the enormous amounts of data they generate and the expensive hardware to maintain that data. However, cloud computing may not be the super solution that everyone seems to be suggesting. Obviously, the cloud provides a lot of benefit to a business. The ability to purchase computing power in units that represent disk storage, CPU cycles and RAM is revolutionary. For decades… View full post »

In-Band and Out-of-Band Network Management

May 18th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
In-Band and Out-of-Band Network Management

One of the best practices managing your production network devices is to have both, an in-band and out-of-band system management in place. An in-band management involves managing devices through the common protocols such as telnet or SSH, using the network itself as a media. It is a common way that provides identity based access controls for better security. By doing so, it is also a good practice to segregate your management traffic from your production customer traffic. If your network is for example congested due to the real user traffic – you will at least be able to login… View full post »

Internet Service Provider Reliability

May 17th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment 1 comment
Internet Service Provider Reliability

If you are in the business where your services are heavily dependent on your network, your business could be as strong as or as weak as your Internet Service Provider, or ISP for short. Shopping for your ISP service, whether it is a dedicated circuit between your offices or an internet access could be quite a journey. The most important factor to consider when trying to sign up for an ISP service is service reliability. The tricky part here obviously is the fact you are agreeing to pay for service that you can only guess about how reliable it’s going… View full post »

Open Source Network Management Tools

April 9th, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Open Source Network Management Tools

Computer networks today have grown in size and complexity. Monitoring and managing the various servers, routers, switches and other devices that make up a modern network is a daunting task. In the enterprise space, several vendors have created robust suites of tools to simplify this process such as HP OpenView and IBM Tivoli. However, what many do not realize is that there are many capable and robust suites of open source networking tools available to simplify network management and monitoring at the fraction of the cost of those expensive enterprise solutions. These open source networking suites… View full post »

Changing Requirements in Software Development

March 23rd, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Changing Requirements in Software Development

It was at one of my previous jobs, when I had to witness an unpleasant relationship between engineering and business folks. Company’s main product was a network optimization software that would enhance standard internet routing protocols. Team was small and we were pretty much following a traditional development model, where requirements were fully understood and signed off by customers and business analysts before the engineers would start working on the product. In the early life of the product company was targeting the ISP business, however as time went by and product was not selling well, company decided to market the… View full post »

Agile Methodology: Software Over Documentation

March 22nd, 2010 (Guest Blogger)Leave a comment
Agile Methodology: Software Over Documentation

One of the other main values in software development using Agile Methodology is choosing a working software over a complete documentation. Reading Scott Ambler on Agile Modeling: Like it or not, the primary goal is not to produce extraneous documentation, extraneous management artifacts, or even to produce models. Creating extraneous documentation can be comforting because you can fool yourself into believing that you are making progress when in fact you’re not. Instead, you’re actually avoiding a difficult task, likely writing and testing code that may show that your chosen approach isn’t working as well as you thought it… View full post »